Read the Success Stories for these former Bits & Bytes Farm horses.

 

The newest Success Stories have been moved to their own site: www.OTTBSuccessStories.com

 

* Horses with asterisk in front of their name were purchased as Prospect Horses directly from the track.

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Briteliteinthenite

Click here to see Briteliteinthenite's Prospect Horse for Sale page.

 

Elizabeth's Note: Most people who get one of our off-the-track Thoroughbreds are surprised at how easy it is to train them. We are not. We have lots of experience choosing horses at the track and we work very closely with people who know the horses and the trainers. We try to buy only quiet and sound horses from people we trust.

We wants lots of competitors doing what we do. We will help anyone find another off-the-track Thoroughbred if they do a good job training the previous horse. You must be willing to spend quality time training and not just be looking for a quick turn around and a quick buck. Part of our Sales Agreement is that we will always help you market any horse you purchase from us.

 

Bits & Bytes Farm Success Stories

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Briteliteinthenite aka "Brite"

Briteliteinthenite with his new mom Beth Anderson.
Briteliteinthenite with his new mom Beth Anderson.

August 23, 2006

Dear Elizabeth,
Brite continues to do well. He has now had two weeks of training. I am pleased with how well things are going. The canter is not yet confirmed...he canters ok to the right, but its hard to get to the left!!!! Isn't it usually just the opposite? I have not yet introduced him to any jumping.

I would like to start some small jumps in the next week or so. His trot work is really good and he is great when I take him out for walks. He has a real confident feel to him which I think is a huge plus.

This might sound strange since I do like him so much but, I am probably going to want to sell him once I get a bit more training in on him. The reason is, I have really enjoyed this process and I want to do it again. I am NOT into showing but I love doing the basic "rehab" type of work. I can't really afford to keep him AND get another one off-the-track, and that is what I would like to do.

My thought is that once I can get an easy canter depart both directions and he can jump some little fences, I will want to go ahead and advertise him. Once I sell him, I would immediately like to start looking for the next one. I hope you will understand my motives and not think for a minute that I don't really like him. I just would really like to be able to do what I love.

Please let me know what you think.

Thanks for all of your help.
Beth

Elizabeth's Note: Ah yes, my friends say I am way past being addicted to getting Thoroughbreds off-the track and I am on to being a "pusher". But, truth be known - I want to turn everyone into "pushers of off-the-track Thoroughbreds"! Once you get one, you will be hooked! ;--)

Read more of Elizabeth's Notes below.

August 16, 2006

Hi Elizabeth
Thanks for the response. Yes I will send photos when I am able to get some good ones. Soon I hope!

I have a question.....since I am having such a good experience with Brite, I am starting to think that I would like to do this again. If I could, I would feel really good about getting a horse off of the track and out of that life, putting good quality time and training in on him and then making a little money for myself. I am NOT a horse breaker, I would not want to work with the really difficult ones. I AM (I believe) a good sensitive rider and my horses are generally really pleasant to ride.

At present I am not working, seems that I spend most of my time with the horses.....I need to have some money coming in and I have thought that with your knowledge of the track people....who to trust....who to stay away from etc. , perhaps I could get another horse with the thought of it being a project to sell. I would love to discuss this with you , I am sure many of the folks you deal with do this.....I'd like to know more about how it works out when people get one from you to sell later....do you help them sell through your web site? Any thoughts would be appreciated. The other thing I have no idea about is price ranges....If you don't mind, I think it would be great to come for a visit to the farm some day and discuss all of this.

Thanks so much,
Beth

Elizabeth's Note: Most people who get one of our off-the-track Thoroughbreds are surprised at how easy it is to train them. We are not. We have lots of experience choosing horses at the track and we work very closely with people who know the horses and the trainers. We try to buy only quiet and sound horses from people we trust.

We wants lots of competitors doing what we do. We will help anyone find another off-the-track Thoroughbred if they do a good job training the previous horse. You must be willing to spend quality time training and not just be looking for a quick turn around and a quick buck. Part of our Sales Agreement is that we will always help you market any horse you purchase from us.

August 15, 2006

Hi Elizabeth,
I can't believe how well Brite is doing. You were so right when you said "He will be a different horse in one month". Truer words were never spoken. What amazes me is how fast he is changing. I am done with my travels and now am dedicating my time to riding.

No more using a stud chain. He leads and stands quietly. I can even tack him up with the lead rope just hanging in front of him. He puts his head down for me to scratch his ears and rub his neck. He is still just a tiny bit nippy, but he usually only does that when I first come up to him....it is like it is an old habit and even he isn't sure why he does it. Anyway, he is MUCH better about that.

He stands still while I mount from the ground...(does not want to get near a mounting block). The best news is that he is learning to stretch into the bridle and go forward in a relaxed easy manner. It is so much fun to feel the change. I love the challenge and he makes it so pleasant! I can feel him figuring out what I am asking. He understands my leg and he is moving more and more to the outside rein. Every once in awhile I get some great strides that feel very even and connected. He seems to enjoy the work. He is not resistant or upset by anything we do. Once I explain something, he tries to do it right.

The trot is much improved. Just through the work he is learning to relax and move from his shoulder.

Thank you Elizabeth for getting him off of the track and into my hands. He is a really nice horse and everything that you said has been right on! I will keep you posted...Beth

Training Note from Elizabeth to Beth & Briteliteinthenite:

I am always amazed at how quickly these horses learn and how they want to please. I am pleased that Briteliteinthenite is working out for you.

What you are experiencing is more the norm, than anything else. "Brite" will bond with you and he will follow you around like a great big puppy dog. Off-the-track Thoroughbreds really want to be the center of attention and will do what ever you ask, just to get the attention.

Training an off-the-track Thoroughbred is so rewarding. All is takes is time and patience. It really is not difficult for a good, sensitive rider. If you can explain what you want, in a way they can understand, they will do it - again and again. They even remember from one lesson to another and they are quick to move on to more difficult lessons. It is very fulfilling.

July 23, 2006

Hi Elizabeth,
Brite is doing fine. Saturday I brought him up here to our part of the world....I didn't want to leave him at Janis' any longer as she is getting a boarder and it would have been too crowded. So he is up here at a facility where he can stay until I get back from my trips. I am happy to have him closer, I should have done that from the beginning ...so I could have spent more time with him. He seems quieter all the time, I very much enjoyed working with him today on his ground manners, I use some of the John Lyons techniques and he responded very well. I really enjoy that part of training. My question is this....His walk is great, his canter seems fine, but his trot is so short and tight. I just talked to your husband and he said it was not unusual for a horse off the track to trot like a sewing machine and in fact, that is just what Brite does. I would love to get some feedback regarding this.....thank you!
Beth

Elizabeth's Note: It is not uncommon for the an OTTB to be a little short when they first come off-the-track. The sewing machine action is because he is not relaxing in the back and working through. This could be because his hips need chiropractic adjustment or he just needs to learn to go long and low. We do butt tucks and cross under exercises that our chiropractor has taught us to limber up the back. Another good exercise is to lunge the horse with loose side reins and let him feel how good it is to stretch down and work through his back end.

Don't worry too much about the trot at this point. I have had this issue with many horses. Part of the problem is also the shoeing and it takes a few months for the feet to get right after the bad farrier work at the track.

Another exercise is to trot over five poles on the ground set at 4'6". Have two more sets of five poles set up - one with spacing of five feet and the other four feet. Go through the 4'6" ones about seven times then do the five foot ones seven times and then do the four foot ones seven times. By the time you get done you will see a major change in the trot. It will be much more even and rhythmic. See the Training Notes from Elizabeth pages for more training suggestions.

July 19, 2006

Dear Elizabeth,

It has been nine days since we picked up Brite at the Farm. It really only took a few days for him to calm down and relax into his new routine. It has been fun to see the change, he was quite aloof at first. He now seems to like being handled, bathed and brushed. 

The farrier took his racing plates off and re-shod him for his new career....he was very good about that, and of course that was essential since the farrier is also my husband! I haven't started any re-schooling yet. I think it is good just to let him settle down for awhile and let the drugs get out of his system. He will remain at Janis's farm until I get back from my trips. I am looking forward to bringing him home and slowly introducing him to his new way of life. It is really hard to tell what he moves like. He has a lovely big walk, and his canter looks very good, but I can't tell what his trot is like because the only trot I see is right before he jumps into the canter. I am assuming that this is normal because I imagine the nice big "reachy" trot that I look for is NOT what is asked for at the track. I look forward to seeing what emerges over time. Thanks for everything.

 Beth Anderson

"Brite" is a son of Dynaformer whose stud fee is $100,000!
"Brite" is a son of Dynaformer whose stud fee is $100,000!


"Brite's" Information from his former Prospect Horse for Sale page.

"Brite" is a 6 year-old, dark bay gelding who sticks at 16 hands even. His sire is Dynaformer which makes him the half brother of this year's Kentucky Derby winner - Barbaro! Dynaformer's stud fee is $100,000. You won't have to pay anywhere near that price to buy this sound and athletic gelding.

"Brite" still enjoys training in the morning but he is no longer competitive. The trainer has new babies coming in to train and he needs the stall ASAP so he has "Brite" very well priced. This horse is not for a timid rider as he can still be a little "up" when going to the track. His only blemish is a very old splint that is old and cold and it does not effect him in any way. He was purchased by Beth Anderson of Summerville, Georgia.

 


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